Neutering and Spaying

Neutering is the surgical removal of parts of the reproductive system, rendering an animal sterile and unable to produce offspring. 

 

The only valid, non-medical reason to neuter your male guinea pig is because you have a female you want him to room with. ***Neutering does little to change the behavior of aggressive guinea pigs, unlike the effect it has on other types of animals. Likewise, neutering does little to curb mounting or sexual behavior. It will prevent unwanted pregnancies. There is no need or reason to neuter two boars living together. If they don't get along now, neutering won't help.

***Removing the female sex organs means your cavy cannot get ovarian cysts or tumors, a potential health benefit. If your guinea pig has been diagnosed with ovarian cysts or tumors, spaying is usually the best treatment option. However, all considerations and risks must be weighed before deciding upon any elective surgery

 

 Are risks involved in neutering? Yes. The risks are detailed below. However, they can be minimized. Are there risks in keeping two opposite-sex fertile animals in the same house? Yes. Even with the best of intentions and diligent practices, accidents can happen. Accidental pregnancies can result in the death of a sow or serious health problems requiring major veterinary care. Can those risks be minimized? Yes. Can either risk be completely eliminated? No. Please be aware that as with any surgery, even with a healthy animal, the best vet, and proper after-surgery care, there is a chance that your guinea pig may not make it. Only you can weigh your options and determine the best course for you and your animals